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Beatty DD- 528 - History

Beatty DD- 528 - History


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Beatty

Born in Jefferson County, Wis., 26 November 1853, Frank Edmund Beatty, graduated from the Academy in 1875. He commanded Wisconsin (BB-9) during the world cruise of the Atlantic Battleship Fleet. He was later Commandant of the Navy Yard and the Naval Gun Factory, Washington, D. C. Rear Admiral Beatty also assisted in improving naval artillery practice and in developing an electric range finder. He retired 6 October 1919 and died at Charleston, S. C., 16 March 1926.

Beatty (DD-528) was renamed Mullany (q. v.) 28 May 1941.

(DD-664 dp. 1630; 1. 348'3"; b. 36'1"; dr. 17'5"; s. 37 k.;
cpl. 276; a. 5 5", 10 21" TT.; cl. Gleaves)

Beatty (DD-640) was launched 20 December 1941 by Charleston Navy Yard; sponsored by Mrs. Charles H. Drayton, daughter of Admiral Beatty; and commissioned 7 May 1942, Lieutenant Commander F. Stelter, Jr., in command.

Beatty joined the Atlantic Fleet and patrolled along the east coast and in the Caribbean until 8 October 1942. She escorted the Southern (Safi) Attack Force to the North African invasion (8-11 November 1942). The destroyer then began escorting convoys between New York and Casablanca, French Morocco, making three round trips between 12 December 1942 and 28 April 1943. Departing New York 8 June she arrived at Oran, Algeria, 22 June. She left Oran 5 July and during 10-12 July took part in the invasion of Sicily.

Returning to New York 4 August, she then completed a round trip convoy escort mission to the Mediterranean (21 August-21 September). Departing New York 2 October she escorted a convoy to Britain and there picked up another convoy (28 October) for the Mediterranean. While off Cape Bourgaroun, Algeria, 6 November 1943, German aircraft attacked the convoy. After fighting off several planes, Beatty was torpedoed- She broke in two and sank about three hours and 22 minutes later. Eleven of the crew were lost and eight wounded during the attack.

Beatty received three battle stars for her World War II service.


USS Beatty (DD-640)

USS Beatty (DD-640) là một tàu khu trục lớp Gleaves được Hải quân Hoa Kỳ chế tạo trong Chiến tranh Thế giới thứ hai. Nó đã tham gia trong Thế Chiến II cho đến khi bị không kích đối phương đánh chìm ngoài khơi Algérie năm 1943. Nó là chiếc tàu chiến đầu tiên của Hải quân Hoa Kỳ được đặt theo tên Chuẩn đô đốc Frank E. Beatty (1853-1926).

Lịch sử
Hoa Kỳ
Tên gọi USS Beatty (DD-640)
Đặt tên theo Frank E. Beatty
Hãng đóng tàu Xưởng hải quân Charleston
Đặt lườn 1 tháng 5 năm 1941
Hạ thủy 20 tháng 12 năm 1941
Đỡ đầu bởi bà Charles H. Drayton
Nhập biên chế 7 tháng 5 năm 1942
Danh hiệu và
phong tặng
3 × Ngôi sao Chiến trận
Số phận Bị không kích đối phương đánh chìm ngoài khơi Algérie, 6 tháng 11 năm 1943
Đặc điểm khái quát
Lớp và kiểu Lớp tàu khu trục Gleaves
Trọng tải choán nước 1.630 tấn Anh (1.660 t) (tiêu chuẩn)
Độ dài 348 ft 3 in (106,15 m)
Sườn ngang 36 ft 1 in (11,00 m)
Mớn nước 13 ft 2 in (4,01 m)
Động cơ đẩy list error: <br /> list (help)
2 × turbine hơi nước hộp số
4 × nồi hơi ống nước
2 × trục
công suất 50.000 shp (37.000 kW)
Tốc độ 37,4 hải lý trên giờ (69 km/h)
Tầm xa 6.500 nmi (12.040 km 7.480 dặm) ở tốc độ 12 hải lý trên giờ (22 km/h 14 mph)
Thủy thủ đoàn
đầy đủ
16 sĩ quan, 260 thủy thủ
Vũ trang list error: <br /> list (help)
4 × pháo 5 in (130 mm)
4 × pháo phòng không Bofors 40 mm (2×2)
5 × pháo phòng không Oerlikon 20 mm (5×1)
5 × ống phóng ngư lôi 21 in (530 mm)
2 × đường ray thả mìn sâu


Beatty DD- 528 - History

TIN CAN SAILOR Magazine

Highlights Summer 2020 Edition

U-Boat Sanctuary Inside the Lion's Den
The Wasp-Hobson Collision First Memories

Recent changes to the Tin Can Sailors Web Site

March 11, 2021
Updated Reunion Listings
Updated Magazine Highlights

October 5, 2020
Added new items to Ships Store
Updated Magazine Highlights

June 15, 2020
Added Coffee to Poet's Corner

May 13, 2020
Updated Magazine Highlights

April 18, 2020
Shipmate Registry updated (information as of April 13, 2020)

March 31, 2020
Updated Reunion Listings
Added Reunion in Review for USS Hepburn (DE/FF-1055)

March 3, 2020
Added new items to Ships Store

February 13, 2020
Shipmate Registry updated (information as of February 11, 2020-169 entries added)
Updated Reunion Listings

January 28, 2020
Updated Reunion Listings
Updated Magazine Highlights

January 17, 2020
Updated Reunion Listings
Added Christmas Poem to Poet's Corner

December 27, 2019
Shipmate Registry updated (information as of December 26, 2019-245 entries added)

December 9, 2019
Added Recipe for Parmesan Chicken to That Good Navy Chow

December 4, 2019
Updated Reunion Listings
Added Recipes for Baked Halibut with Tomatoes, Bread Dressing, Escalloped Eggplant with Tomato and Soft Sugar Cookies to That Good Navy Chow

November 3, 2019
Added Book Review for Tin Cans and Greyhounds
Updated Magazine Highlights

October 28, 2019
Shipmate Registry updated (information as of October 21, 2019-243 entries added)

October 24, 2019
Added new items to Ships Store
Updated Reunion Listings

July 3, 2019
Shipmate Registry updated (information as of June 26, 2019-136 entries added)

June 26, 2019
Updated Tributes (added Tributes from May 2019)
Updated Magazine Highlights

June 13, 2019
Added Call Sign for USS Blair (DE/DER-147)

May 16, 2019
Shipmate Registry updated (information as of May 13, 2019-158 entries added)

March 25, 2019
Shipmate Registry updated (information as of March 21, 2019-182 entries added)

March 5, 2019
Updated Reunion Listings
Updated Magazine Highlights
Added Recipe for Chicken Rice Soup to That Good Navy Chow
Added USS Cone Thanksgiving Menu 1946 to Memorabilia

March 1, 2019
Added Change of Command Program cover for US Naval War College
Added Commissioning Information for USS Grayson (DD-435)

February 27, 2019
Added new clearance items to Ships Store
Added new items to Ships Store

February 11, 2019
Updated Tributes (added Tributes from January 2019)
Added Recipes for Baked Beef Hash, Braised Veal Patties and Ham Slices, Smothered to
That Good Navy Chow

February 8, 2019
Shipmate Registry updated (information as of January 28, 2019-114 entries added)
Updated Reunion Listings

February 5, 2019
Added Recipes for Beef Loaf, Butterscotch Brownies, Cry Baby Cookies, Deviled Eggs,
Hamburgers Epicurean and Macaroni Salad to That Good Navy Chow

February 4, 2019
Updated Reunion Listings
Added Recipes for French Fried Onions, Fudge Cookies, Plain Soft Rolls and
Veal Fricassee to That Good Navy Chow
Added Histories for USS Lowry (DD-770), USS Spruance (DD-963), USS Stanly (DD-478), USS Little (DD-79), USS Tattnall (DD-125/APD-19), USS Worden (DD-352) and USS Hull (DD-945) to TCS Destroyer Histories

January 28, 2019
Updated link for Tin Can Sailors of Goose Creek

January 23, 2019
Added Recipes for Chicken Croquettes, Frankfurters in Blankets and Veal Stew to
That Good Navy Chow
Added Histories for USS Carpenter (DD-825), USS Childs (DD-241), USS Greene (DD-266) and USS Norfolk (DL-1) to TCS Destroyer Histories

January 17, 2019
Today in Naval History has been moved to Ship Information Center

Tin Can Trivia has been moved from Communication Center to Other Information
Memorabilia has been moved from Other Information to Ship Information Center
Added Link for USS Knapp (DD-653)

January 10, 2019
Added Shoulder Patches for USS DeHaven (DD-469) , USS DeHaven (DD-727) , USS Lloyd Thomas (DD-764) , USS Lloyd Thomas (DE-312) , USS Lloyd Thomas (DD-374) , USS Parsons (DD-949/DDG-33) , USS Reeves(DE-156) and USS Reeves (DLG/CG-24) Added Recipes for Beef Goulash, Corned Beef Filling, Pumpkin Pie and Spaghetti Loaf to

That Good Navy Chow
Book and Movie Reviews has been moved from Communication Center
to Other Information

January 9, 2019
Added Recipes for Oyster Jambalaya, Shrimp Chop Suey, Beef Croquettes and Lyonnaise Potatoes to That Good Navy Chow

December 31, 2018
Shipmate Registry updated (information as of December 26, 2018-146 entries added)
Added Book Review for Crucible of a Generation

December 19, 2018
Added link for USS Taylor (DD/DDE-468)
Updated Magazine Highlights

November 16, 2018
Shipmate Registry updated (information as of November 13, 2018-572 entries added)

November 1, 2018
Added new DesVets items to Ships Store

October 5, 2018
Shipmate Registry updated (information as of October 3, 2018-572 entries added)


July 18, 2018

Added Reunions in Review for USS Power (DD-839)


Beatty History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The surname Beatty was first found in Roxburghshire, Scotland, where they held a family seat from ancient times.

Coat of Arms and Surname History Package

$24.95 $21.20

Early History of the Beatty family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Beatty research. Another 76 words (5 lines of text) covering the years 1296, 1597, 1603, 1735, 1771, and 1803 are included under the topic Early Beatty History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Unisex Coat of Arms Hooded Sweatshirt

Beatty Spelling Variations

Although the name, Beatty, appeared in many references, from time to time, the surname was shown with the spellings Beattie, Beatty, Beaty, Beatie, Betay, Bety and others.

Early Notables of the Beatty family (pre 1700)

Another 46 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Beatty Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Beatty family to Ireland

Some of the Beatty family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 61 words (4 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Beatty migration +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Beatty Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Charles Beatty, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1729 [1]
  • Daniel Beatty, who arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1744 [1]
  • William Beatty, who settled in Charles Town [Charleston], South Carolina in 1774
  • Patrick Beatty, who arrived in Newcastle, Del. in 1789
  • James Beatty, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1795 [1]
Beatty Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Samuel Beatty, who arrived in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1802 [1]
  • Stephen Beatty, aged 2, who arrived in New York, NY in 1803 [1]
  • Isabella Beatty, aged 22, who arrived in New York, NY in 1803 [1]
  • Rebecca Beatty, aged 21, who landed in New York, NY in 1803 [1]
  • Rich Beatty, who arrived in America in 1805 [1]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Beatty migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Beatty Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • Matty Beatty, aged 20, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship "Edward Reid" in 1833
  • Richard Beatty, aged 30, a labourer, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship "Edward Reid" in 1833
  • Mrs. Ellen Beatty, aged 32 who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "Mary Brack " departing 3rd May 1847 from Limerick, Ireland the ship arrived on 12th June 1847 but she died on board [2]
  • Mr. Hugh Beatty, aged 6 who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "Eliza Caroline" departing 3rd May 1847 from Liverpool, England the ship arrived on 14th June 1847 but he died on board [2]
  • Miss. Sarah Beatty, aged 2 who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "Emigrant" departing 11th August 1847 from Liverpool, England the ship arrived on 3rd October 1847 but she died on board [2]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Beatty migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Beatty Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. John Beatty, (b. 1814), aged 25, Irish labourer who was convicted in Fermanagh, Ireland for 10 years for stealing, transported aboard the "Blenheim" on 19th May 1839, arriving in Tasmania ( Van Diemen's Land) [3]
  • Robert Beatty, aged 19, who arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "South Sea"
  • Isabella Beatty, aged 18, a servant, who arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "South Sea"
  • Andrew Beatty, aged 31, who arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "Agincourt"
  • Thomas Beatty, aged 19, who arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "Agincourt"
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Beatty migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Beatty Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. John Beatty, (b. 1817), aged 44, English farm labourer, from Langford travelling from London aboard the ship "Royal Stuart" arriving in Lyttlelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 8th October 1861 [4]
  • Mrs. Margaret Beatty, (b. 1817), aged 44, English settler, from Langford travelling from London aboard the ship "Royal Stuart" arriving in Lyttlelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 8th October 1861 [4]
  • Miss Margaret Beatty, (b. 1843), aged 18, English farm servant, from Langford travelling from London aboard the ship "Royal Stuart" arriving in Lyttlelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 8th October 1861 [4]
  • Miss Jane Beatty, (b. 1844), aged 17, English farm servant, from Langford travelling from London aboard the ship "Royal Stuart" arriving in Lyttlelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 8th October 1861 [4]
  • Mr. Alexander Beatty, (b. 1846), aged 15, English farm labourer, from Langford travelling from London aboard the ship "Royal Stuart" arriving in Lyttlelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 8th October 1861 [4]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Beatty (post 1700) +

  • Admiral of the Fleet Sir David Beatty (1871-1936), 1st Earl Beatty, English Admiral in the Royal Navy
  • Ned Beatty (1937-2021), American two-time Emmy Award winning and Academy Award nominated actor
  • Robert Rutherford Beatty (1909-1992), Canadian actor from Hamilton, Ontario, known for his roles in 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), Superman IV: The Quest for Peace (1987), The Pink Panther Strikes Again (1976) and Where Eagles Dare (1968)
  • Otto Beatty Jr. (1940-2021), American politician, Member of the Ohio House of Representatives (1980-1999)
  • Rear Admiral Frank Edmund Beatty (1853-1926), American officer in the United States Navy, eponym of the USS Beatty (DD-756)
  • Roger Beatty (1933-2020), American five-time Emmy Award winning television writer, best known for his work on the Carol Burnett Show, the Bing Crosby Show, the Red Skelton Show and the Danny Kaye Show
  • Miss Mary Angela Beatty M.B.E., British Law and Politics Teacher for Whitefield School in Cricklewood, was appointed Member of the Order of the British Empire on 8th June 2018, for services to Education [5]
  • Mr. Malcolm Howard Beatty O.B.E., Irish Chief Executive of Forest Service for the Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs in Northern Ireland Executive, was appointed Officer of the Order of the British Empire on 29th December 2018 for services to the Natural Environment [5]
  • Christopher Beatty (b. 1973), American college football assistant coach
  • David Beatty (b. 1946), 3rd Earl Beatty
  • . (Another 12 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Historic Events for the Beatty family +

Flight TWA 800
  • Mr. Charles Beatty (1946-1996), from Sportsylvania County, Virginia, USA, American engineer for the Navel Surface Warfare Center flying aboard flight TWA 800 from J.F.K. Airport, New York to Leonardo da Vinci Airport, Rome when the plane crashed after takeoff he died in the crash [6]

Related Stories +

The Beatty Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Lumen coeleste sequamur
Motto Translation: May we follow heavenly inspiration.


Beatty DD- 528 - History

TIN CAN SAILOR Magazine

Highlights Summer 2020 Edition

U-Boat Sanctuary Inside the Lion's Den
The Wasp-Hobson Collision First Memories

Recent changes to the Tin Can Sailors Web Site

March 11, 2021
Updated Reunion Listings
Updated Magazine Highlights

October 5, 2020
Added new items to Ships Store
Updated Magazine Highlights

June 15, 2020
Added Coffee to Poet's Corner

May 13, 2020
Updated Magazine Highlights

April 18, 2020
Shipmate Registry updated (information as of April 13, 2020)

March 31, 2020
Updated Reunion Listings
Added Reunion in Review for USS Hepburn (DE/FF-1055)

March 3, 2020
Added new items to Ships Store

February 13, 2020
Shipmate Registry updated (information as of February 11, 2020-169 entries added)
Updated Reunion Listings

January 28, 2020
Updated Reunion Listings
Updated Magazine Highlights

January 17, 2020
Updated Reunion Listings
Added Christmas Poem to Poet's Corner

December 27, 2019
Shipmate Registry updated (information as of December 26, 2019-245 entries added)

December 9, 2019
Added Recipe for Parmesan Chicken to That Good Navy Chow

December 4, 2019
Updated Reunion Listings
Added Recipes for Baked Halibut with Tomatoes, Bread Dressing, Escalloped Eggplant with Tomato and Soft Sugar Cookies to That Good Navy Chow

November 3, 2019
Added Book Review for Tin Cans and Greyhounds
Updated Magazine Highlights

October 28, 2019
Shipmate Registry updated (information as of October 21, 2019-243 entries added)

October 24, 2019
Added new items to Ships Store
Updated Reunion Listings

July 3, 2019
Shipmate Registry updated (information as of June 26, 2019-136 entries added)

June 26, 2019
Updated Tributes (added Tributes from May 2019)
Updated Magazine Highlights

June 13, 2019
Added Call Sign for USS Blair (DE/DER-147)

May 16, 2019
Shipmate Registry updated (information as of May 13, 2019-158 entries added)

March 25, 2019
Shipmate Registry updated (information as of March 21, 2019-182 entries added)

March 5, 2019
Updated Reunion Listings
Updated Magazine Highlights
Added Recipe for Chicken Rice Soup to That Good Navy Chow
Added USS Cone Thanksgiving Menu 1946 to Memorabilia

March 1, 2019
Added Change of Command Program cover for US Naval War College
Added Commissioning Information for USS Grayson (DD-435)

February 27, 2019
Added new clearance items to Ships Store
Added new items to Ships Store

February 11, 2019
Updated Tributes (added Tributes from January 2019)
Added Recipes for Baked Beef Hash, Braised Veal Patties and Ham Slices, Smothered to
That Good Navy Chow

February 8, 2019
Shipmate Registry updated (information as of January 28, 2019-114 entries added)
Updated Reunion Listings

February 5, 2019
Added Recipes for Beef Loaf, Butterscotch Brownies, Cry Baby Cookies, Deviled Eggs,
Hamburgers Epicurean and Macaroni Salad to That Good Navy Chow

February 4, 2019
Updated Reunion Listings
Added Recipes for French Fried Onions, Fudge Cookies, Plain Soft Rolls and
Veal Fricassee to That Good Navy Chow
Added Histories for USS Lowry (DD-770), USS Spruance (DD-963), USS Stanly (DD-478), USS Little (DD-79), USS Tattnall (DD-125/APD-19), USS Worden (DD-352) and USS Hull (DD-945) to TCS Destroyer Histories

January 28, 2019
Updated link for Tin Can Sailors of Goose Creek

January 23, 2019
Added Recipes for Chicken Croquettes, Frankfurters in Blankets and Veal Stew to
That Good Navy Chow
Added Histories for USS Carpenter (DD-825), USS Childs (DD-241), USS Greene (DD-266) and USS Norfolk (DL-1) to TCS Destroyer Histories

January 17, 2019
Today in Naval History has been moved to Ship Information Center

Tin Can Trivia has been moved from Communication Center to Other Information
Memorabilia has been moved from Other Information to Ship Information Center
Added Link for USS Knapp (DD-653)

January 10, 2019
Added Shoulder Patches for USS DeHaven (DD-469) , USS DeHaven (DD-727) , USS Lloyd Thomas (DD-764) , USS Lloyd Thomas (DE-312) , USS Lloyd Thomas (DD-374) , USS Parsons (DD-949/DDG-33) , USS Reeves(DE-156) and USS Reeves (DLG/CG-24) Added Recipes for Beef Goulash, Corned Beef Filling, Pumpkin Pie and Spaghetti Loaf to

That Good Navy Chow
Book and Movie Reviews has been moved from Communication Center
to Other Information

January 9, 2019
Added Recipes for Oyster Jambalaya, Shrimp Chop Suey, Beef Croquettes and Lyonnaise Potatoes to That Good Navy Chow

December 31, 2018
Shipmate Registry updated (information as of December 26, 2018-146 entries added)
Added Book Review for Crucible of a Generation

December 19, 2018
Added link for USS Taylor (DD/DDE-468)
Updated Magazine Highlights

November 16, 2018
Shipmate Registry updated (information as of November 13, 2018-572 entries added)

November 1, 2018
Added new DesVets items to Ships Store

October 5, 2018
Shipmate Registry updated (information as of October 3, 2018-572 entries added)


July 18, 2018

Added Reunions in Review for USS Power (DD-839)


Welcome to Beatty, Nevadathe Gateway to Death Valley!


Located on the crossroads of Hwy. 95 and State Route 374, Beatty offers easy access to Death Valley National Park, off roading, bird watching, hiking, ghost town exploration, camping, photography, filming, star gazing, geocaching, and the list goes on.

The town of Beatty is an unincorporated township with a Town Advisory Board of 5 elected members. The Board meets on the 2nd and 4th Monday of each month at the Beatty Community Center 6:30 pm.

The Beatty Town Advisory Board will continually strive to provide up-to-date information on town services and what we are doing to enhance quality of life for our residents and a more enjoyable experience for our visitors. Check back often for updates on park, recreation and senior center activities, latest action of the Town Board, township news, and other areas of interest.

We pride ourselves in being a pet friendly town. Most of the hotel/motels in town are pet friendly as well as the RV parks. So don't forget your best friend when visiting, they are welcome in Beatty


Biden's Climate Chops Face A Big Test On Old-Growth Forests

In the Cascade Mountain Range of west-central Oregon, near the small town of MacKenzie Bridge, is an area of Willamette National Forest that’s home to a patchwork of mature Douglas fir and western hemlock. The oldest are between 120 and 150 years, towering more than 100 feet.

Few mature forests remain in the continental United States after decades of intensive logging. And, like so many before them, these trees could soon be gone as the U.S. Forest Service moves ahead with a plan that would allow about 2,000 acres to be cut down in what’s known as the “Flat Country” project .

The Biden administration is pushing an aggressive environmental agenda, pledging to both slash greenhouse gas emissions at least in half and to conserve 30% of America’s lands and waters by 2030. Those commitments include broad language about the need to “invest in forest protection and forest management” and to “fight climate change with the natural solutions that our forests, agricultural lands, and the ocean provide.”

But President Joe Biden and his team have said little, if anything, about old-growth forests — typically defined as those at least 150 years old and largely undisturbed by human activity. These forests sequester massive amounts of carbon in trees and soil, and scientists say protecting the few that remain intact will prove key to meeting climate and biodiversity targets. That includes the 2,000 acres its own Forest Service is primed to move forward on after issuing its final record of decision in January.

Retired forestry professors Jerry Franklin of the University of Washington and Norm Johnson of Oregon State University helped write the forestry plan that made this area available for potential harvest. Adopted in 1994, the plan sought to curb the decline of northern spotted owls due to clearcutting of old-growth forests while continuing to allow for commercial timber production.

More than two decades later, Franklin and Johnson are speaking out against this and other plans to cut down mature forests, citing the climate and extinction crises. Our scientific understanding of such ecosystems, including their ability to store huge amounts of planet-warming carbon pollution, has improved immensely since then, the two wrote in a recent opinion article .

“It is time to stop logging magnificent mature forests like those in the Flat Country Project once and for all,” they wrote. “These forests simply contribute too much ecologically, socially and spiritually in their current state.”

The Biden administration’s lack of a strong commitment to stop logging areas like this and in Alaska’s Tongass National Forest, the world’s largest intact temperate rainforest, is a “big concern of scientists,” said Beverly Law, a professor emeritus at Oregon State and an expert on the forest carbon cycle.

“Once they are gone, these are trees that have stored [carbon] for hundreds of years, it will take that long to gain it back,” she said. “It also means that most of that carbon is going to go back to the atmosphere in the next few decades. And that’s not going to help us get any closer to meeting our climate goals. It’s going to make the situation worse.”

Pressure To Protect What’s Left

Before Biden was sworn in, his transition team invited Law to submit a scientific position paper on forests and climate mitigation. In it, she and more than a dozen other forest ecology and climate experts called for mature and old temperate forests in Alaska and the Pacific Northwest to be permanently set aside as National Strategic Carbon Reserves .

Law is also working on a comprehensive study to map forested areas with the potential for increased protections, a follow-up to one she co-authored in 2019 that identified forests in the Western United States with a high potential for store carbon and harboring a diversity of plant and animal species.

Preserving ancient forests is a “win-win” for climate and biodiversity, Law told HuffPost.

Biden and his team are facing mounting pressure to do just that as part of the fight to stave off potentially catastrophic climate change.

In a letter last month, dozens of environmental groups, including the National Resources Defense Council and Earthjustice, called on the Biden administration to make the protection of carbon-rich forests a central part of its push during the United Nations climate conference in Glasgow, Scotland, in November.

“Establishing permanent protections for temperate rainforests in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska, along with mature federal forests and trees nationwide, will be one of the most cost-effective and essential near-term climate solutions the United States can employ,” the groups wrote.

It’s hard to overstate the importance of Alaska’s 17-million-acre Tongass National Forest, known as “America’s Amazon.” It stores about 8% of the total carbon isolated in forests in the Lower 48 states, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and an astonishing 44% of all carbon stored in national forests across the United States.

In the Lower 48, about 7% of forests remain intact ― most of them in the Pacific Northwest.

The ‘Elephant In The Room’

Oregon Wild is among the groups pushing the Biden administration to protect what little is left. Last month it launched a website detailing the important role of healthy, mature forests and highlighting active old-growth logging projects, in various stages of development, that could affect about 800,000 acres in Alaska, Oregon, California and Washington.

Steve Pedery, conservation director at Oregon Wild, questions whether Biden’s action on forests will match his rhetoric about climate change being an all-hands-on-deck , no-solutions-off-the-table emergency. He called forests in the Pacific Northwest the “elephant in the room” and said his fear is that the Forest Service ― an agency established in 1905 primarily to ensure a steady supply of timber — will be left to its own devices and continue to “bleed carbon” from remaining forest ecosystems.

The Trump administration prioritized logging, drilling and other resource extraction across federal lands and repeatedly blamed extreme wildfires on forest mismanagement resulting from lawsuits by “environmental extremists.” It also obliterated protections for Tongass, lifting Clinton-era logging restrictions across 9.3 million acres and reclassifying 188,000 acres, including 168,000 acres of old growth, as immediately suitable for harvesting.

Biden signed an executive order his first day in office directing the Department of Agriculture to review Trump’s rollback in Tongass, but the findings are not yet public, and protections have not been officially restored.

Environmentalists have welcomed the forest protection and reforestation language that appear in Biden’s climate and conservation commitments. For example, his job and infrastructure plan, released in March, calls for major investments to “protect and, where necessary, restore nature-based infrastructure ― our lands, forests, wetlands, watersheds, and coastal and ocean resources.”

But they are also waiting to see how this plays out in reality.

The White House referred HuffPost’s questions on logging and forest protection to the Interior and Agriculture Departments. Forest Service spokeswoman Babete Anderson told HuffPost that the “old growth” term “can have a wide variety of definitions and meanings” depending on ecological settings and forest types and that “the Forest Service does not have a one-size-fits-all policy to guide management decisions.”

Instead, a number of environmental laws, land use designations and local conditions guide forest management decisions, Anderson said.

Pedery argues that given the urgency of the climate and extinction threats, old-growth logging should go the way of whaling, which was banned at the federal level in 1971.

“There were a lot of people who were hurt by that change, but it was a change that needed to happen,” he said. “Killing whales is not a sustainable business model. Logging old growth is the same.”

“You might have the most high-tech commercial whaling vessel in the fleet,” he added, “but you’re still killing whales.”

Though Biden has remained silent about old-growth logging at home, he is pressuring Brazil’s far-right president, Jair Bolsonaro, to curb deforestation in the Amazon. On the campaign trail, Biden said he’d mobilize nations to pay Brazil $20 billion to keep the South American country from destroying the rainforest.

The Brazilian government has swung back at Biden, at times pointing out the United States’ own history of razing its forests.

“You’re asking us to solve a problem that you created and are continuing to aggravate,” Brazilian Environment Minister Ricardo Salles recently told Politico. “We want you to help solve our problems with lack of prosperity and economic opportunity in the Amazon region.”


Beatty's Rap / Hilarious `Bulworth' -- the truth sets a senator free

BULWORTH: Political satire. Starring Warren Beatty, Halle Berry, Oliver Platt, Jack Warden, Christine Baranski and Paul Sorvino. Directed by Warren Beatty. Written by Warren Beatty and Jeremy Pikser. (R. 107 minutes. At Bay Area theaters.)

The movie opens as Beatty's character, a California senator named Jay Billington Bulworth, is running for re-election in 1986. Profoundly depressed, he sees the hollowness of his sound bites ("We stand at the doorstep of a new millennium"), mourns the windup, mediagenic hypocrite he's become and hires a hit man to arrange his own assassination.

He also purchases a fat life-insurance policy for his daughter from a corrupt lobbyist -- in exchange for bottling up a regulation bill. The Bulworth that emerges, with three days to live, is a gleefully emancipated prankster who says exactly what he thinks and doesn't give a damn about the consequences.

At a black church, Bulworth tosses out his speech and says, hell no, the Democratic Party doesn't care about you folks -- you don't contribute to our campaigns. "Half your kids are out of work and the other half are in jail. You see any Democrat doing anything about it?"

At a film-industry gathering, he tells the fat cats that their movies stink despite the millions they spend on them. During a major fund-raiser he grabs the mike, steps off the dais and weaves through the tables rapping -- that's right, a white senator rapping -- about global destruction, corrupt oil and insurance companies and taxpayers.

Beatty directed, produced and co- wrote "Bulworth," and it's doubtful that any other Hollywood power -- could have put a story like this on the screen -- or would want to. A shrewd political observer for decades, Beatty has fashioned a hilarious morality tale that delivers a surprisingly potent, angry message beneath the laughs.

It's a fabulous, bold leap on Beatty's part, and you can feel how much the subject energizes him, just as the novelty of truth-telling invigorates his character and puts a goofy grin on Bulworth's face.

Hollywood rarely embraces political satire on this level -- as if it were impolite and would make people uncomfortable -- but Beatty's lampoon shows not only how much we need this kind of commentary, but also how entertaining it can be. Beatty also knows how much party politics have ignored racial injustice and uses humor to reopen the discussion.

The coolest stuff in "Bulworth" happens in the second half when the candidate, having decided that he doesn't want to die after all, befriends a young black woman (Halle Berry) and hides out at her family's ghetto residence. Next thing you know he's dressed in baggy shorts, running shoes, a ski cap and shades, telling a TV interviewer that the solution to discrimination lies in "everybody f-- everybody" until the races totally blend.

Beatty deserves huge credit for pulling off an enterprise as audacious and risky as "Bulworth," for giving such a frisky and intelligent performance, and for drawing the best from his supporting actors: Jack Warden as Bulworth's senior aide, Christine Baranski as his brittle wife, Paul Sorvino as a vicious lobbyist, Don Cheadle as a South Central Los Angeles gang leader and especially Oliver Platt as Bulworth's flustered, bellicose chief operative.

There's even a performance by poet-playwright Amiri Baraka as a homeless muse who resurfaces throughout the film to counsel Bulworth, "You got to be a spirit. You got to sing -- don't be no ghost." That piece of poetry may be the closest Beatty comes to a pure statement here: Take control of your life, he seems to say don't let the system play you for a fool.


USS Hopewell


USS HOPEWELL (DD-681) at the Naval Inactive Ship Facility San Diego, Ca 1971
U.S. Navy Photograph, courtesy of Larry Cote

USS Hopewell (DD-681)
Text from the Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships
Official U.S. Navy Photographs from Naval History and Heritage Command
Additional history available at the Destroyer History Foundation

(DD-681: dp. 2,050 l. 376'6" b. 39'8" dr. 17'9" s. 37 cpl. 319 a. 5 5", 10 40mm., 7 20mm., 10 21" tt, 6 dcp., 2 dct. cl. Fletcher)

The second Hopewell (DD-681) was launched by Bethlehem Steel Co., San Pedro, Calif., 2 May 1943 sponsored by Mrs. R. A. Spruance, wife of Admiral Spruance and commissioned at Terminal Island 30 September 1943, Comdr. C. C. Shute in command.

Hopewell conducted shakedown training in the San Diego area before sailing for Hawaii 13 January 1944. She got underway 23 January for the invasion of the Marshalls, as American amphibious task forces picked up momentum in their drive toward Japan. Steaming as a forward picket ship, Hopewell arrived off Kwajalein 31 January and delivered destructive gunfire support during the initial assault. That night she bombarded Roi and Namur Islands and 1 February moved to screening and patrol duties off the other islands of the group. With the success of the landings assured, Hopewell sailed to Pearl Harbor, arriving 24 February.

The destroyer arrived Purvis Bay, Florida Islands, 14 March to take part in the developing offensive on the northern coast of New Guinea. She carried out screening and patrol assignments, and contributed shore bombardment during the Aitape landings, part of the bold Hollandia operation. After Aitape, an unopposed operation carried out 22 April, Hopewell remained with 7th Fleet patrolling and screening. With three other destroyers she carried out a bombardment of Japanese positions on New Ireland 29 May, and in June joined escort carrier Hoggatt Bay on antisubmarine patrol.

Hopewell's next important operation was the invasion of Morotai, vitally necessary as an air base for the Philippines campaign to come. She arrived 16 September, the day after the initial landing, to assume screening duties, and shot down an attacking Japanese plane that day. On the 18th, she supported an auxiliary landing on Morotai, and sailed 25 September with a convoy for Humboldt Bay.

The long-awaited invasion of the Philippines began with the Leyte landings 20 October, and 4 days later Hopewell arrived with a reinforcement group. A damaged propeller kept her from taking part in the four-part Battle for Leyte Gulf, in which the Japanese Fleet suffered fatal defeat 24-25 October. Next day she departed in the van of a convoy and shaped course for Humboldt Bay, where repairs could be effected. At the eastern entrance to the Gulf the convoy was attacked, and in the battle that followed Hopewell made concealing smoke and shot down two aircraft.

The veteran ship sailed again 8 November for Leyte, and after two trips from Humboldt Bay and return with convoys, she joined the Mindoro invasion forces. After fighting off heavy air attacks en route, Hope-well arrived off the assault area 15 December and provided fire support as troops stormed ashore. As air attacks continued, the ship helped fight fires on LST-472 and assisted in shooting down other planes before sailing again for Leyte at noon.

With Mindoro in allied hands, and air bases for the Luzon invasion under construction, Hopewell prepared for that operation, to be carried out initially at Lingayen Gulf. She sailed 4 January and fought off desperate Japanese kamikaze attacks on the passage to Lingayen, for the landings 9 January joined the screen of an escort carrier group providing air cover. Hopewell joined in the amphibious assault on Corregidor 14 February, and while clearing obstructions from Mariveles Harbor with gunfire engaged a large battery on "the rock". The destroyer laid smoke and moved in to help damaged YMS-48, and soon received four hits, putting her battery control station out of commission. Although suffering 17 casualties, Hopewell remained in Manila Bay until 18 February, when she sailed to Manus for repairs.



USS HOPEWELL (DD-681) smoking amidships, just after she was hit by a Japanese shore battery shell while supporting minesweeping operations off Corregidor, in Manila Bay, Philippines, 14 February 1945. Her camouflage is Measure 31, Design 9d. Official U.S. Navy Photograph. Photo #: NH 53565



USS HOPEWELL (DD-681) damaged from a Japanese shore battery shell that hit the ship amidships while she was supporting minesweeping operations off Corregidor, in Manila Bay, Philippines, 14 February 1945. Official U.S. Navy Photograph. Photo #: NH 44906



USS HOPEWELL (DD-681) raising her port anchor, off the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, 11 May 1945. Official U.S. Navy Photograph. Photo #: NH 99421


The ship next continued to San Francisco, arriving 17 March, and after further repairs sailed for Pearl Harbor 28 May 1945. Training operations in Hawaiian waters occupied her until 20 July, when she sailed for Eniwetok and Guam. The day of the Japanese surrender, Hopewell sailed from Guam with a refueling group supporting famed Task Force 38 which had done so much to bring victory. She operated in Japanese waters in support of the occupation until 21 October 1945, when she sailed for the United States via Pearl Harbor. Arriving Puget Sound Navy Yard 8 November, she later moved to San Diego, where she decommissioned 15 January 1947 and was placed in the Pacific Reserve Fleet.

With the increased demands of the Korean conflict, Hopewell recommissioned 28 March 1951 at San Diego. Immediately following shakedown training she steamed westward to Korea 18 June, taking up screening duties with Task Force 77 as carrier based aircraft blasted Communist positions. The destroyer also bombarded Wonsan and served on the critical Formosa Patrol August-September 1951, returning to Mare Island Yard 5 February 1952.



USS HOPEWELL (DD-681) at the Mare Island Naval Shipyard, California, 4 June 1952. Official U.S. Navy Photograph. Photo #: NH 99423


Hopewell sailed for her second tour in Korea 11 August 1952 after shakedown and training exercises. During this period of stalemate in the land war, the Navy continued to operate against supply lines and strong points, and Hopewell screened the carriers and heavy ships of Task Force 77. Bombardment of Wonsan followed another period of Formosa Patrol, and in December the ship steamed to Formosa to help train Nationalist Chinese sailors. She returned briefly to Korea to screen giant battleship Missouri during bombardment operations late in January 1953, and sailed for the United States 3 March 1953.

After operating off the California coast for several months on antisubmarine training, Hopewell sailed again for the Far East 27 October 1953. She again took part in training exercises and patrol off Formosa, returning to San Diego 23 May 1954. As she began her fourth cruise, a new crisis between Communist China and Formosa developed, and in February Hopewell assisted in the evacuation of the Tachen Islands. Following this important Cold War operation, the destroyer took part in fleet exercises in the western Pacific, returning to San Diego 22 May 1955.



USS HOPEWELL (DD-681) underway, circa 1952, probably entering San Diego Harbor, California. Note that the ship has been converted to carry four 5"/38 guns and three 3"/50 twin gun mounts, but still has a World War II era air search radar antenna. This photograph was received by the Naval Photographic Center in December 1959, but was taken several years earlier. Official U.S. Navy Photograph. Photo #: NH 99425


The veteran ship spent the remainder of 1955 on exercises off the coast. Disaster struck 11 November during an amphibious training operation when a single engine attack bomber crashed into Hopewell amidships, killing five and starting gasoline fires. Alert firefighters brought the flames under control and the ship returned to San Diego for lengthy repairs.

Returning to active operations again 24 March 1956, when she sailed for the Far East, Hopewell resumed her regular pattern of cruises to Japan, Formosa, and Okinawa interspersed with training and readiness exercises off the West Coast of the United States. She operated with Korean and Nationalist Chinese ships on maneuvers in 1958 and 1959 and continued to act as an integral part of America peace-keeping fleet in the Pacific. On 12 November 1959 Hopewell returned to San Diego for extensive refitting and training. As Communist activity to overthrow the legal government of South Vietnam grew, Hopewell was repeatedly deployed from the West Coast to Vietnam from 1960 into 1967 in defense of the small republic. In February 1963 she rescued a crewman from a downed A-3B of Ticonderoga (CVA-14) in the South China Sea. During a 3-month cruise, which ended in August, Hopewell fired 2,276 rounds, destroyed 112 structures, and silenced a Viet Cong mortar attack upon ground forces. For the remainder of 1966, she acted as school ship in gunnery and ASW off the West Coast.

Hopewell received nine battle stars for World War II service and four for Korean service.


USS HOPEWELL (DD-681) berthed at San Diego, Ca May 1971
Photo by Larry Cote


Survey of USS Hopewell (DD-681)

14 NOV 1969 - FIRST ENDORSEMENT on PRESINSURV ltr ser 2178 of 30 Sept 1969

From: Chief of Naval Operations
To: Secretary of the Navy

Subj: Survey of USS HOPEWELL (DD-681)

2. The USS HOPEWELL (DD-681), a LA VALLETTE (FLETCHER) Class destroyer, completed construction of 30 September 1943. The ship has not been modernized, and her capabilities are not up to fleet standards. As a consequence she is not considered to meet present and future warfare requirements. To bring her capabilities up to date, and also to undertake required repairs, would be prohibitively costly.

3. The President, Board of Inspection and Survey has found the USS HOPEWELL (DD-681) unfit for further naval service and has recommended that the ship be stricken from the Naval Register. The Chief of Naval Operations concurs and recommends that the USS HOPEWELL (DD-681) be stricken on 2 January 1970 as provided for in Title 10, USC 7304.

4. Subsequent to the striking, authority is requested to dispose of the USS HOPEWELL (DD-681) in accordance with existing law in a manner most advantageous to the government.

5. Pursuant to the requirements of Title 10, USC 7307 and because this ship has been found to be unfit as required by law, it is hereby certified that the USS HOPEWELL (DD-681) is not essential to the defense of the United States.


18 NOV 1969 - SECOND ENDORSEMENT on PRESINSURV ltr ser 2178 of 30 Sept 1969

From: Secretary of the Navy
To: Chief of Naval Operations

Subj: Survey of USS HOPEWELL (DD-681)

1. Returned, approved. The USS HOPEWELL (DD-681) shall be stricken from the Naval Register on 2 January 1970.

2. The Chief of Naval Operations is granted authority to dispose of the USS HOPEWELL (DD-681) as recommended in the first endorsement and will take the necessary action incident to the disposal.

Frank Sanders
Assistant Secretary of the Navy
(Installations and Logistics)

Walleye II Missile Test
NAVAL MESSAGE - NAVY DEPARTMENT
8 JAN 1972


From: CNO
To: RULSSAA/CHNAVMAT

Subj: WALLEYE II TEST UTILIZING TARGET HULL

1. REF A authorized sinking of EX-JOHN C. BUTLER (DE-339) as a target for Walleye II tests with warhead. REF B reported sinking of EX-JOHN C. BUTLER due to break up of ship in heavy weather. REF C requested assignment of another target hull to complete tests. REF D concurred in REF C and provided further information of need for target.

2. Accordingly, EX-HOPEWELL (DD-681) berthed at INACTSHIPFAC San Diego, Calif, is authorized for use as a target as a replacement for EX-JOHN C. BUTLER. Conditions and location of sinking approved REF A.

3. The following actions are requested.

A. Arrange for completion of any remaining target hull stripping.
B. Prepare ship to meet requirements of REF E.
C. Arrange and advise ALCON custody changes as they occur.
D. Dispose of subject ship as target to destruction as authorized REF A.
E. Report exact location and date of sinking.


MULLANY DD 528

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    Fletcher Class Destroyer
    Keel Laid January 15 1942 - Launched October 12 1942

Struck from Naval Register October 6 1971

Naval Covers

This section lists active links to the pages displaying covers associated with the ship. There should be a separate set of pages for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Covers should be presented in chronological order (or as best as can be determined).

Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.


Watch the video: Lecture of Opportunity. John Maurer: A history lesson on the Battle of Jutland (May 2022).


Comments:

  1. Steele

    somewhere I've already seen this ...

  2. Saelac

    not bad!!!



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